Monday, February 13, 2017

Has Spring really sprung? #phenology

Over the weekend I saw a report that common lilacs in St. Paul's Como Park had budded out. That prompted me to check our local stand of common lilacs in Carlos Avery WMA. I don't consider these budded out yet, but they are showing signs of life.

common lilac contemplating bud burst
common lilac contemplating bud burst
Photo by J. Harrington

The red osier dogwoods have recently reddened up.

red osier dogwood showing color
red osier dogwood showing color
Photo by J. Harrington

The Sunrise River is loosening its icy grip along the west (top) bank,

Sunrise River starting to thaw
Sunrise River starting to thaw
Photo by J. Harrington

while in the shadows, snow and last year's Bergamot(?) seed heads prevail.

Bergamot(?) in snowy shadows
Bergamot(?) in snowy shadows
Photo by J. Harrington

Early Spring in the North Country is a mixed blessing. Some bemoan the loss of ice fishing, pond hockey and cross country skiing. Others worry about seasonal, or late season, frosts and freezes after prolonged warm spells. Adaptation to climate change will be a challenge for us all, but this year it's time to start tracking signs of Spring and hope it's not a false start.

[UPDATE: Why You Shouldn't Hope for an Early Spring]

The Thaw


I saw the civil sun drying earth’s tears —
Her tears of joy that only faster flowed,
Fain would I stretch me by the highway side,
To thaw and trickle with the melting snow,
That mingled soul and body with the tide,
I too may through the pores of nature flow.
But I alas nor tinkle can nor fume,
One jot to forward the great work of Time,
‘Tis mine to hearken while these ply the loom,
So shall my silence with their music chime.


********************************************
Thanks for visiting. Come again when you can.
Please be kind to each other while you can.